The FOLK METAL Radar (Episode #1/2019)

I believe that the combination of heavy metal with folk and epic music is one of the most successful of the last thirty years. These two genres seem to have been born to be blended together and one reinforces the other. Unfortunately, however, all successful discoveries attract hordes of bands without ideas and creativity that seek to emerge by just following trends and fashions, without adding anything new to the genre that they play.

For this reason, I think it’s important to isolate those bands that really manage to produce something interesting and valid. In the case of folk metal music, I’m convinced that this means being able to produce songs that are folk and metal, which is something different from playing folk music with heavy metal instruments, or heavy metal with some folk melody inside.

In the first episode of my new digest dedicated to folk metal I’m presenting five albums that I consider the most relevant among those published since the beginning of 2019. You’ll find here both well-established formation but also some interesting underground stuff. As far as geography is concerned, we have one band from Noway (Týr), one from Italy (Furor Gallico), one from Denmark (Vanir), one from Romania (Dirty Shirts), and a multi-national collaborative project (Ahl Sina).

Enjoy this first episode of the folk metal radar, and stay tuned for future updates.



“Hel”, by Týr


Without any doubt, one of the most awaited events by all folk metal enthusiasts was the publication of the new album by Týr, the legendary band from the Faroe Islands. The LP, called Hel, interrupts in fact a gap of six years from their previous publication, which is also the longest time between two albums that they ever experienced to date.

Once released, Hel confirmed to be a very good record. In this respect, all the years that were spent waiting for the new album have been rewarded by the release of one of the most engaging and solid folk metal records of the recent times.

Those who have been following the band throughout their long career were probably expecting something even more brilliant, an album that could shine in the night like the “Northern Star” that the band was aiming in one of their most famous songs. But when a band is as good as Týr, it manages to excite even when it doesn’t reach the highest peaks of its production.


I’ve published a dedicated review of Týr‘s new album, you can read it from here.




“Troops of Pain”, by Ahl Sina


In the early days of the year, I had the opportunity to listen to an odd album called Troops of Pain, played by a curious band named Ahl Sina. After some study, I learned that Troops of Pain was conceived almost ten years ago, but only in recent times, the members of the band found themselves in the right condition to record and release the material. Ahl Sina, in true honesty, should be treated more as a collaborative project rather than a proper band, if only because their members never met and they assembled the songs by putting together pieces that were recorded in separate countries.

It’s not the first time that I come across to such kind of projects and usually the results depend very much on the basic idea that generated the collaboration, in particular on how strong and cohesive is the originating concept, because this shall compensate for the loss of naturalness that’s naturally caused by the absence of a direct and immediate relationship between the musicians. In the case of Ahl Sina, the unifying element was the idea to mix together the elements of traditional middle eastern music with the sounds of progressive metal and to use the music to tell about ancient, fascinating and timeless stories. Nothing particularly new, to tell the truth, and in fact, the album in its essence looks like one of many other entries in the widely explored genre of Oriental Extreme Metal. But there were two things that caught my attention and made me reconsider my first (negative) reaction about the LP.

First: in the album there are actually a few particularly nice and catchy songs (the best one, for me, is called Miracle Demise); when we listen to these tracks we manage to forget, at least for a brief span of time, the inaccuracies and defects that today affect Ahl Sina’s music: from the fairly approximate musical production which generated the muffled sounds we hear in the album, to the songwriting (practically there isn’t any harmonic development in the songs of the LP: all the instruments, and also the voice, seem to follow the same melodic lines).

Secondly, beyond the stylistic considerations, I perceive in this debut LP a genuineness of intents and a passion for oriental music and folk legends that effectively impregnate all the songs of the album. Therefore, despite Troops of Pain is definitely far from being the album which can shake and revolt the world of folk metal, there is still something good and curious in this music, something which makes this project worthy of a mention, and also of our encouragement for the future.



“Dark of the Ages”, by Furor Gallico


I am extremely pleased to mention in this article the new release from an Italian band that has already collected some notoriety in the international folk metal scene. The band is called Furor Gallico, they come from Lombardia, in the Northern part of my beautiful peninsula, and they have already turned ten years of activity.

Dusk of the Ages is Furor Gallico’s third and newest LP. The album offers a new collection of nice melodic songs that are inspired by the stories and the sounds of the Celtic tradition. One of the key characteristics of this album is definitely the duality: two voices (one growling and one angelic), two languages (some songs are in Italian, others in English), two types of sound (moments of melodic death metal are opposed to atmospheric sections with acoustic arrangements). All of these contrasting elements guarantee an internal dynamic for the songs that keep the record alive from the beginning to the end, although the musical offer remains somehow restricted within the same track that has already been travelled by many other bands.

A special note of merit goes to the acoustic sections, which in my opinion give the most exciting moments of the album. Who knows what would happen if these guys will decide one day to switch to 100% acoustic music.



“Allfather”, by Vanir


Danish band Vanir is not a newcomer in the international folk metal scene, as witnessed by the fact that as the band is turning the ten years of career they have already released their fifth studio album, called Allfather. Despite a certain prolificity in publications, however, these musicians from Roskilde have not yet achieved a celebrity and a success comparable to the commitment they have always shown in the production of new material.

Will Allfather be the record capable of projecting the band higher up in the ladder of success? Honestly, I’m not sure. The metal formula that this band proposes, in fact, seems too much a hybrid of different things that is likely to leave quite dissatisfied both those who seek epic and catchy songs and those who instead adore more complex and articulated musical structures. Vanir’s new record, in this respect, is quite in the middle between these two characteristics of folk/Viking metal, without being effective in either of them.

In summary, Allfather is an album with lots of good ideas and which highlights the dedication and the passion of the band when playing their music. At the same time, if I still recommend it for the diehard fans of Viking metal, the LP won’t remain among the things that have impressed me the most in this first part of the year.



“Letchology”, by Dirty Shirt


When we speak about the combination of metal with world music or folk music, typically we have in mind those cases where metal is influenced by Celtic, Nordic or Middle Eastern traditions. Every so often, however, we come across formations that are coming from areas of the World that are quite distant from the usual ones and, in these case, we may enjoy more curious variations of the “metal folk” recipe.

Last year we were impressed by Alien Weaponry, a young band from New Zealand which debuted with a formidable collection of groove songs marked by the sounds and the hymns of the Maori tradition. This year we could appreciate an album from Romania which is offering to the fans of this kind of mixtures a nice and funny version of metal that’s impregnated with the sounds and the melodies from Eastern Europe’s tradition. The band is called Dirty Shirt, and their most recent record is Letchology.

My approach towards folk metal is based on the idea that we shall always try to distinguish between the aspects of originality and curiosity, which are those which impress at first, and the absolute value of the music. In this respect, the initial reaction that I had with Letchology was that of a funny, curious, eccentric album, but not particularly significant from the point of view of the “metal” content. This is mainly because the band’s style is characterized by evident ease of accessibility and also the adoption of riffs and progressions that – if we except the ethnic flavours – don’t bring so much innovation to the culture of groove music.

After a few more listenings the situation has improved and, progressively, I recognized that behind such light-hearted and irreverent facade it’s possible to appreciate the effort of these guys in making each song of the album quite different from the others, and I could discern also a number of interesting ideas that remain valid even beyond the initial appearance of easy-listening metal.



I’m collecting the best folk metal songs of the year in a special playlist, called The FOLK METAL Radar. It’s now featuring a bunch of tracks but it’s going to grow with time.


Quick Review: “Hel” by Týr

In the course of the last twenty years, Faroese band Týr have gained the status of “masters of folk metal”, and many lovers of this genre of music include some of the band’s LPs among the best folk metal albums that were ever released. Even myself, who don’t belong to the family of the most diehard fans of folk metal, I’ve literally consumed some of their historical releases, especially the couple of albums that were published at the turn of the last decade (2009’s By the Light of the Northern Star and 2011’s The Lay of Thrym).

Despite the physiological ups and downs that characterize the discography of every band, especially those who’ve been playing for so long, there are – and there will always be – some special characteristics in the music of Týr that make their records so unique and enjoyable. These include the capacity to generate tangible feelings of bravery and courage, together with a “desire to fighting” that we can leverage also for our everyday battles.


Týr’s newest album, called Hel, interrupts a gap of six years from their previous LP, which is also the longest distance between two albums in their discography. That’s why all the fans of the band became immediately excited when the news of a new record started to circulate on the media.

One of the reasons for the time which passed after the previous record is that in the last years the band underwent through many important changes in the line-up, including the departure of one of the historical members of the formation. After 17 years spent with the band, in 2018 guitarist Terji Skibenæs announced his intention to quit. And because there were also a few replacements for the drummer’s seat, the result is that the new line-up of the band is for 50% different from the one which recorded the two masterpieces that I mentioned at the beginning of the article.

After so many years, it’s not easy to quantify how much a certain change of style is due to the changes in the band’s line-up rather than to a natural evolution in their musical sensibility. The fact, however, is that Týr’s new album, although still exciting and engaging, seems to have lost part of the immediacy and the facility to engage the listener which we appreciated in the band’s best works.


I consider Hel as a very good record, there is no doubt about it, and Týr confirms their status as one of the most important and valuable bands in the domain of folk and Viking metal. In this respect, all the years that were spent waiting for the new album have been rewarded by the release of one of the most engaging and solid folk metal records of the recent times. Those who have been following the band throughout their long career were probably expecting something even more brilliant, an album that could shine in the night like the “Northern Star” that the band was aiming in one of their most famous songs. But when a band is as good as Týr, it manages to excite even when it doesn’t reach the highest peaks of its production.

My overall rating for Hel is 7/10. Among the best songs of the album I can definitely mention Garmr, Far From the Worries of the World, and the two singles which anticipated the LP: Sunset Shore and Ragnars Kvæði.



Týr’s new album can be streamed from Spotify, and it’s now featured in The FOLK METAL radar, which is the playlist that collects the best songs released in 2019. Follow it, and check it periodically because it’s going to grow with time.


Music of War

Chapter 1, “Messina Ridge” by God Dethroned (2017)

The Battle of Messines (7-14 June 1917) was an offensive conducted by the British Second Army on the Western Front near the village of Messines in West Flanders, Belgium, during the First World War.

he tactical objective of the attack at Messines was to capture the German defences on the ridge to deprive the German 4th Army of the high ground.

The battle began with the detonation of 19 mines beneath the German front position, which devastated the German front line defences and left 19 large craters. This was followed by a creeping barrage 640 m deep, protecting the British troops as they secured the ridge with support from tanks, cavalry patrols and aircraft

Break through the stalemate, capture defenses on the ridge
Devastate front line defences, assemble the troops in No man’s land

Fire a creeping barrage, to support the infantry advance
Outflank strong points and machine gun nests
Repulse another attack

Detonate the mines beneath their front lines
Pillars of fire
Vanished an entire army

Messina ridge

The creeping bombardment threw up smoke and dust
Blocking the view of the defenders
The forward zone was overrun, anticipate a counter attack

Detonate the mines beneath their front lines
Pillars of fire
Vanished an entire army

Chapter 2, “War Rages On” by Memoriam (2017)

Declaration of War: Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s broadcast to the nation (3 September 1939, 11am): “I have to tell you now that no such undertaking has been received, and that consequently this country is at war with Germany

And so it came to pass as time rolls by
Once more into battle, no questions why

The final stand, life comes to an end
The last bastion, as war rages on

You never thought that it would end in defeat
Arising from the wreckage, the victory complete

And now you stand, last remnants of man
This cannot be undone, the war now rages on

So now we rise again prepared to die
Another nameless victim, the enemy denied

Chapter 3, “You Must Kill” by Cavalera Conspiracy (2008)

After a series of defeats from Dunkirk to Singapore, Churchill could finally tell the House of Commons that “We have a new experience. We have victory – a remarkable and definite victory

You must kill, another body killed
We must kill, another blood is spilled
You must kill, another soul is ill
We must kill, another life killed

We must kill, another deadly sin
You must kill, another orphan land
We must kill, another atrocity
You must kill, another misery

You must kill, and blood will follow
We must kill, there’s no tomorrow
You must kill, death will follow
We must kill, there’s no tomorrow

Judgment, torment, execution

You must kill, this is not a drill
We must kill, this is for real
You must kill, another body ill
You must kill, another blood is spilled

Judgment, torment, execution

Chapter 4, “They Came to Die” by Unleashed (2015)

World War II was the deadliest military conflict in history in absolute terms of total casualties. Over 60 million people were killed, which was about 3% of the 1940 world population. Military deaths from all causes deaths totaled from 21 to 25 million, including deaths in captivity of about 5 million prisoners of war

In this cold aftermath where the blood has dried at last
Soldiers lay scattered around in the fields of death, a fading sound

They came to die

A shameful march without a sound with weapons pointed at the ground
They came out of the mist so it all came down to this
Now approaching our lines Heavens cry, their souls have died
Christ is dead or so it seems death before loyalty

They came to die

In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus Sancti, Death before loyalty

They came to die

In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus

They came to die

Chapter 5, “Burial Lines” by Unearth (2014)

This cornerstone, a testament of worth
With razored claws that freeze the hands of delusion
Force feed a dream in a state of pure unrest
This cornerstone lines the stars never resting

No one can take it away, a life unresting
No one can take it away, I’ll defend my Kingdom

Force feed this dream until I drown
No one can take it away, Now die my will unconquered

Through the bloodshed burials lines
A darkness waits for the night to come
Blood spilled while the watchers fall
Now face to face to defend my kingdom

With razored claws that freeze the hands of delusion
Not again I won’t let this slip through my fingers
I’ll keep running through
I’ve found my home lives at the Rivers Edge
I’ll keep rushing through

Face to face I defend my Kingdom

Chapter 6, “Shadow of the Swastika” by TYR (2011)

Given their strategic locations regarding Britain and Russia, the Nordic countries in World War II were the targets of German conquest or control, along with the nearby islands, while the British tried to stop them. Finland fought two wars against the Soviet Union and one against Germany, while Denmark and Norway were invaded and occupied by Germany. Iceland and the other islands were under British or American occupation, as was Greenland. Only Sweden managed to remain neutral, cooperating with both belligerent factions.

You who think the hue of your hide means you are to blame
And your father’s misdeeds are his son’s to carry in shame
Not mine I’ll take no part
You can shove the sins of the your father where no light may pass
And kiss my Scandinavian ass

Pages of the past, how long will they last?
A lie lost in the legacy of fools left us this parody unsurpassed

Pages of the past, how long will they last?
The shadow of the Swastika by fools’ fears now for far too long has been cast

You who think the hue of your hide means you get to blame
The black for your own faults and so bring humanity shame
Make sure you count me out of the ranks of your inbred morons
With your sewer gas and kiss my Scandinavian ass

Pages of the past, how long will they last?
A lie lost in the legacy of fools left us this parody unsurpassed

Pages of the past, how long will they last?
The shadow of the Swastika by fools’ fears now for far too long has been cast

Chapter 7, “Raise your Horns” by Amon Amarth (2016)

In Norse mythology, Valhalla is a majestic, enormous hall located in Asgard, ruled over by the god Odin. Chosen by Odin, half of those who die in combat travel to Valhalla upon death, led b7y valkyries, while the other half go to the goddess Freyja’s field Fólkvangr. In Valhalla, the dead join the masses of those who have died in combat and various legendary Germanic heroes and kings, as they prepare to aid Odin during the events of Ragnarök.

Victory we fought hard and prevailed
Brutally we were fighting
Stormy seas rolling thunder, piercing hail
Battlefield lit by lightning
Eagerly we filled the waves with enemies
Hungrily ravens cawing
Home shore calls, we return on bloody seas
Twilight falls, darkness crawling

So pour the beer for thirsty men
A drink that they have earned
And pour a beer for those who fell
For those who did not return

Raise your horns raise them up to the sky
We will drink to glory tonight
Raise your horns for brave fallen friends
We will meet where the beer never ends

No regrets we went out to war and strife
To protect king and country
Victory honor those who gave their life
Willingly we will not grieve

So pour the beer for thirsty men
A drink that they have earned
And pour a beer for those who fell
For those who did not return

Raise your horns raise them up to the sky
We will drink to glory tonight
Raise your horns for brave fallen friends
We will drink tonight

Raise your horns raise them up to the sky
We will drink to glory tonight
Raise your horns raise them up to the sky
We will drink tonight

Raise your horns raise them up to the sky
We will drink to glory tonight
Raise your horns for brave fallen friends
We will meet in Valhalla again

Chapter 8, “War Order” by Asyllex (2017)

The kings of the World, and the sons of man.
Have declared a war, which is close at hand.
The people of earth have to take a stand

Listen to the voice, of the higher hand.
So many people, slain on command.
A war against the world, just to keep the brand
Lives at stake, due to high demand.

This is war, war order. This is war, war order.

The lies, the hate, the violence
They cry, they fear the Jeviathan.
As a mastermind of crowd control

Let the bodies burn, and let none return

Listen to the voice, of the higher hand.
So many people, slain on command.
A war against the world, just to keep the brand
Lives at stake, due to high demand.

This is war, war order. This is war, war.

An army as one, stands against them all.
The slayer of man, up against the wall.
Millions to save, he has to be brave.
Nothing to spare, but will he dare?

Let the bodies burn, and let none return.