Quick Review: “Vol II: El Desborde y El Ocaso” by Neoyka

Listening to the new album released from a well-established formation is generally something nice to do: thanks to their qualities, these kinds of bands have already emerged from the mass of mediocre publications and therefore we can expect to listen to something interesting and enjoyable. But when there is a new band that arrives and impresses for originality and value, the pleasure is really incomparable with anything else. Especially because the idea of discovering good underground formations is definitely more exciting than writing a couple of paragraphs for the fifteenth disc published by a well-known group, for which there are hundreds of reviews already available on the web.

In recent times I had the pleasure to discover an interesting band arriving from Chile, called Neoyka. And it was love at first sight. I was truly excited to enjoy a fresh and lively approach to stoner music, something which emanates since the first riffs all the passion and the efforts that were spent by the band in the recording studio. These guys come from a city called “La Serena”, which stands for “A Serene City”, and perhaps it’s not a coincidence that their intriguing version of stoner rock produces such a feeling of positivity and universal energy.


Neoyka’s new album is named Vol II: El Desborde y El Ocaso and it follows their debut LP, named Vol. I, which was released in late December 2013. With respect to their first release, the band has now incorporated a keyboardist/synth player as a permanent member, and this gives a hint about how the group is progressively incorporating psychedelic and progressive sounds into their sound. Their latest publication, in fact, oscillates between what we could define a rather conventional stoner rock, with reminiscences from groups such as Kyuss and Fu Manchu, and a variant of that psycho-stoner that’s played today by bands like All Them Witches.

The collection of songs that we find in their new record moves with good naturalness between these two versions of stoner, and in both cases, we can appreciate a remarkable quality of songwriting together with warm and engaging sounds.


This is an album which will be appreciated by all lovers of stoner rock and stoner metal. There is no real innovation in the music of Neoyka, but they know what they do, and they do it very well. I’m going to track them with more attention from now on, there is really good potential in this band.

My overall rating for the album is 6.5/10. My favourite songs are 70 Rockas, which is a straight and simple stoner track in the style of Kyuss, Nuestra Marcha, which starts slow but then evolves into a catchy and quite original song, and the dreamy and fuzzy suite which concludes the LP, named Introspection.



Vol II: El Desborde y El Ocaso is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed also from Spotify. Neoyka are now featured in DUST AND SAND, the playlist with the best of modern stoner. Check it out, listen to it and follow it, because it’s periodically updated with new songs.


Quick Review: “South of Reality” by The Claypool Lennon Delirium

Those of my generation know very well the genius of Les Claypool, the fantastic American bassist and singer that became famous during the ‘90s as the leader of that crazy formation which is Primus. The golden sequence of Primus’ records that goes from their debut Frizzle Fry (1990) to the legendary Pork Soda (1993) has marked the musical development of many fans of rock music, allowing us to broaden our horizons outside the usual genres that we were used to listening on the radio and in the car stereo.

Like all good things, however, the magic of the music of Primus’ first albums began gradually to fade, and Claypool himself embarked on a parable that led him, year after year, to maintain a niche of fans which was, at least in size, decidedly different from the masses of enthusiasts who were following him in the beginning. Even for what concerns myself, I slowly began to lose track of his works, also because those few times that I approached the new publications from Primus (the last was released last year) I was quite disoriented, to use a euphemism.

Anyway, among the many projects were Les Claypool has been protagonist in the recent times, the one initiated with Sean Lennon is perhaps the one that intrigued me the most: this mixture of alternative rock, psychedelia and classic progressive rock is definitely interesting, and it also allowed Claypool to find again a fertile ground for his unique and particular style of bass.


On February 2019 the collaborative project between Lennon and Claypool named The Claypool Lennon Delirium has relased their second LP, South of Reality, which follows their debut album Monolith of Phobos (2016) and the following album of covers Lime and Limpid Green (2017).

Honestly, I found myself enjoying this album well beyond what I could expect at the beginning: Claypool’s craziness and creativity merge perfectly with Lennon’s melodic sensibility and the songs of the album result at the same time intriguing and curious as they are fresh and catchy. South of Reality is really fun to listen to, and in this respect, it reminds me, with all the due differences, of the great album that was published last year by the King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard.

My overall rating for the LP is 7.5/10. It’s really nice to be surprised again by an artist whom we had lost sight of. The music of South of Reality, however, is enjoyable and objectively valuable even for those who aren’t aware of all the impressive background of Les Claypool.

My favourite songs of the album are Amethyst Realm, the opening track Little Fishes, Cricket Chronicles, and the title track South of Reality.


South of Reality is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed also from Spotify.



The Claypool Lennon Delirium are now featured in YELLOW EYES, the playlist with the best of modern progressive and psychedelic rock.


The GOTHIC MUSIC Radar (Episode #1/2019)

Rather than pointing at a well defined and specified genre of music, the term Gothic indicates a broad scope of bands which combine heavy metal or rock sounds with dark atmospheres, melancholic melodies, romantic or gloomy lyrics. As a result, every good collection of gothic music can only be quite heterogeneous. Indeed, in this selection of the six most relevant records since the beginning of 2019, you will find genres ranging from grunge to atmospheric death metal, and touching also rock and doom. Everyone of the following LPs, however, has within all those elements of charm and darkness that we like so much in Gothic music.

As far as geography is concerned, we have two bands fro the United States of America (A Pale Horse Named Death and Cold Colours), one from Denmark (Demon Head), one from Finland (Swallow The Sun), one from Spain (Helevorn), and one from Germany (Ewigheim).

Enjoy this selection of LPs and stay tuned for the future updates of the GOTHIC MUSIC radar.



“When the World Becomes Undone”, by A Pale Horse Named Death

One of the major events of the first months of 2019 was definitely the release of the new album by A Pale Horse Named Death, which is the band founded by ex-Type O Negative and ex-Life of Agony drummer Sal Abruscato. The album, named When the World Becomes Undone, provided another good example of that intriguing mix of gothic metal and grunge that the band already introduced in the previous two albums.

I was truly impressed by this LP, specifically by the beautiful combination of dark atmospheres, heavy and melodic riffs, with slow – but not obsessive – rhythms. I’ve published a full review of the album, that was included among the category of the Best New Albums. You can check that out for the details.




“Hellfire Ocean Void”, by Demon Head

Among the albums of the first two months of 2019 than more than the others feature all the typical elements of gothic metal, there is for sure Hellfire Ocean Void, the new record from the Danish formation Demon Head. Active since 2012, this quintet from Copenhagen has released in February the third LP of a discography that has attracted so far the attention of both the fans of gothic rock and doom metal.

Their new work is definitely more oriented towards rock than metal, and it’s also characterized by a feeling of antiquity that is mainly due to the particular way in which the various instruments have been recorded for the LP. When you launch Hellfire Ocean Void in your stereo, it will look like you have taken an old record of the 70s for how the sound is dark and also fairly muffled. Assuming that this was a deliberate stylistic choice, I can see its positive aspects: first of all the sense of vintage that emerges from the songs of the LP and, from a certain point of view, the relative unicity of this style. At the same time, however, the sound of this album appears a little anachronistic and, in some moments, it doesn’t make justice to the captivating and fascinating melodies that are played by the band.

In short, Hellfire Ocean Void is a truly curious album: it’s beautiful to listen to for its fascinating and obscure songs, but it’s absolutely anti-modern for its sound and style.



“When a Shadow Is Forced into the Light”, by Swallow the Sun

The new LP by the Finnish band Swallow the Sun was already included in the digest that I released for doom metal, but When a Shadow Is Forced into the Light contains so many elements of Gothic that I had to mention also in this article.

The LP is fully permeated by dark atmospheres, but mainly because of the presence of an impressive number of beautiful melodies, it never becomes oppressive. In this respect, the band has really achieved an impressive maturity in songwriting: the guys from Jyväskylä really know how to build up and dissolve the tension, and how to balance melancholic and energetic moments so that the songs remain always well equilibrated and relatively enjoyable to hear.

There is on the blog a dedicated review of this LP, you can get some more details from there.



“Aamamata”, by Helevorn

There is another publication that will appear in two different editions of the radar. It is Aamamata, the fourth LP from Spanish band Helevorn, which features equal components of doom and gothic metal, and a final touch of death metal.

This sextet of musicians has always strived for the definition of an individual and original direction for their music, which has been always accompanied by excellent performance and also impeccable recording, something that we can appreciate also in the last work. But if the recipe of their style seems to be farily intriguing, Aamamata in my opinion signs a small step back for the band. The album, in fact, seems to lack that passion and intensity that I appreciated in the first works of Helevorn. Their music, today, is stylistically impeccable, but seems much less effective from the emotional point of view.



“Irrlichter”, by Ewigheim

Ewigheim, from Germany, embodies in all respects the stereotype of the Gothic band. Starting from the name, which in German means “Eternal Home”, that is a way of saying to represent death), but also for the sinister lyrics (at least those few I had the patience to translate from German) and the melodic and dark melodies of their songs.

Compared to the other albums that were introduced earlier in this digest, Irrlichter is the one that makes the most continuous and persistent use of piano and keyboards, while on the contrary, it’s definitely the one that shows the most simple and linear structures for the songs. The result is a collection of extremely accessible but at the same time melancholic and sad songs. The album releases a feeling of distrust, of lost opportunities, so it’s hardly the record that you’ll want to hear when there is the need for a little boost in motivation.

In the broader context of the band’s discography, Irrlichter is the seventh LP released by Ewigheim. The style follows substantially what was already heard in the previous album Finding Smooth Salvation in Death: it’s a kind of music that misses the depth and the longevity of the best works of gothic metal, but which is absolutely enjoyable to listen to.



“Northernmost”, by Cold Colours

The last album that I want to recommend for the lovers of Gothic metal is Northermost and was released by Cold Colours, an American band that has consolidated with the years a very nice and fairly original style of death metal that’s full of atmospheric and gothich elements.

The music played by this band blends the melodic and melancholic aspects of gothic with a growling-like style of singing, and also quite complex musical structures. The tracks featured in Northernmost are undoubtedly interesting, but unfortunately, the album has some approximations in terms of the arrangement and also for what concerns the production. These faults don’t permit this LP to reach the level of quality of the albums that were mentioned before. Although this is the fifth album of a career which approaches the twenty-five years, there is something amateurish in the way this formation has arrived at the making of their new album. And it’s sincerely a shame because, from the point of view of the creativity and also the songwriting, the band shows unquestionable qualities.



If you liked the music presented in this article, you will love the playlist GOTHIC, which collects some of the best gothic songs of the last period. Check it out and follow it, it’s going to grow with time.



Quick Review: “The Crucible” by Motorpsycho

This time, I started listening to the new album by Motorpsycho with particular trepidation. Next May the band is visiting my city next and their latest material will be presumably the core of their concert. But indepently from this specific and personal reason, the fact that there is on the shelves a new LP from Motorpsycho is, by itself, an event. The three guys from Trondheim have in fact achieved the status of legends of rock and every new album is always unpredictable and full of surprises. Their discography is long and articulated, and across their career, the band moved through different phases and also relatively different musical styles, including progressive, hard rock, psychedelia, and also heavy metal.

At the end of 2017 the band amazed us with The Tower, a great album which proved to fans and critics how much they still like playing loud and psychedelic rock and roll. In this respect, the entry of a new drummer proved to be a revitalizing element for the band. Today, one year and a half after The Tower, Motorpsycho are back with a new LP called The Crucible. And in absolute continuity with their tradition, we are in front of a new stage in their evolutionary journey through rock music. All of those who were expecting something like The Tower are faced with something completely different: an old-fashioned rock opera with only three long songs totalling 40 minutes of impressive and trippy music.


Before entering into the discussion about the quality of their new songs, let me point out how this approach is completely against the business model we see in contemporary music. Given their lenght, it’s very hard to imagine the songs of The Crucible being included within the most successful rock playlists that we can access from Spotify or other similar services that are available on the web. But as it always happened with Motorpsycho, these guys don’t care about trends or mainstream success: every new record contains what they wanted to play in that specific moment, and that’s all. For this LP, their muse commanded them to write three epic pieces full of heavy riffs, endless solos and innumerable changes of atmosphere. Take it or leave it, this is Motorpsycho and they set the rules.

Musically speaking, the three songs of The Crucible are relatively different one from the other. The first one (Psychotzar) is the more accessible of the three and we can find inside it, all merged together, many of the elements that characterized their recent productions. It’s basically psychorock but with very engaging and powerful guitar riffs, on top of which we may enjoy lots of intriguing solos. The second piece (Lux Aeterna) starts softly and atmospherical, with an incipit that reminded me of the sound of Trust Us, which is still one my favourite albums in their discography. After four minutes, however, the songs commences to deviate into psychic madness and the central part of the song, to be honest, is very hard to digest even after many listenings. The last song (The Crucible) is also the longest of the LP with 20 minutes of duration. The track is basically the combination of what we heard in the first two pieces: catchy and headbanging riffs, sections of pure psychedelia, a few moments of dreamy atmospheres, and engaging choruses.


Considered globally, the LP is absolutely rich of many interesting things, even if it’s not always easy to follow with the same attention all the evolutions that come one after the other in every song. The experience of going through The Crucible may be a bit dizzying, it’s a roller coaster of passages and sounds but without the usual points of references that we expect from a rock song. A fairly demanding listening, which can be however extremely rewarding for the lovers of old-school progressive rock.

Taking into acount all the pro’s and cons’, my overall rating for the album is 7/10. My favourite songs is the opening track of the LP: Psychotzar.

The Crucible can be streamed from Spotify.


For those who already like their music, or for those who want to have a better understanding of the good things they’ve done in their impressive career, I’ve made a special playlist called ANGELS AND DAEMONS, with my selection of their best pieces. Check it out!


BEST ROCK OF 2019 / EPISODE 1: The Best Five Albums released in the first 6 weeks of the year

These first weeks of Rock music were really full of nice surprises, coming from both emerging and consolidated bands. And, as a result, this selection of the best albums of the year to date, features five fairly exciting and also innovative records. We have one irreverent but damn fun new formation (Queen Zee), two records that successfully managed to combine experimentation with enjoyability (from Lorelle Meets the Obsolete and TOY), a band that keeps growing in quality despite the continuous revolutions in its line-up (Cherry Glazerr) and, finally, a band that in the recent past has already conquered the hearts of fans and critics, but which never ceases to improve with every new release (The Twilight Sad).

There have been really many beautiful things to hear in these first weeks of the year. Let’s run again through the best albums, and we shall stay prepared for what has yet to come!



#5) “Happy in the Hollow”, by TOY

Indie Rock
“Happy in the Hollow” is the fourth LP by TOY. The album was released on January, 25th 2019, and it arrives three years after their previous record Clear Shot (2016)

Happy in the Hollow, which is the fourth and newest LP by British band TOY, aims at pursuing an experimental and progressive approach whilst still adopting a musical language that wants to remain accessible and enjoyable to hear. And the goal is fundamentally achieved.

From a musical point of view, Happy in the Hollow is an album made of contrasts: basic rock riffs combined with psychedelic elements, scratchy sounds and angelic voices, and also the combination of acoustic instruments with electronic inserts. Even the atmospheres of the songs are never completely defined: in the most “serene” pieces, there is something which leaves a taste of restlessness and claustrophobia, just as in the darker pieces we always see some light which is shining on the horizon.

TOY’s new album is full of ideas and it sparks of creativity, but it also requires a certain dedication to be fully appreciated. The band from Brighton continues to experiment and evolve their style of psychedelic indie rock, despite the fact that their latest work isn’t maybe the most immediate and catchy among those they published to date.

You can read here the review of the LP that was published on the blog.

TOY was formed in 2010 in Brighton. Today the band consists of Tom Dougall (guitar and voice), Dominic O’Dair (guitar), Maxim Barron (bass), Charlie Salvidge (drums), and Max Oscarnold (keyboards).


#4) “Stuffed & Ready”, by Cherry Glazerr

Indie Rock / Garage Rock
“Stuffed & Ready” is the new studio album by American rock band Cherry Glazerr, released on February 1, 2019. The LP is the third of a discography which includes the debut album “Haxel Princess” (2014) and “Apocalipstick” (2017).

Stuffed & Ready is the third LP from American rock band Cherry Glazerr, and like the previous releases it features a completely new line-up around
Clementine Creevy, who’s the undisputed leader of the band and the only remaining member of the initial formation.

The style of the band is built upon the combination of indie and garage rock, and all the songs of the new LP convey an enjoyable sense of immediacy and authenticity. And even if we’re not dealing with particularly memorable and profound pieces, it’s very easy to be influenced by the rebellious and slightly sarcastic spirit of the album, also because the new record shows a tangible shift towards indie pop sounds, which certainly guarantees a more direct and immediate impact, at least in the short term.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of the LP is the apparent ease with which Clementine Creevy manages to play motifs that stick to your hears and which result, in most of the cases, extremely nice and catchy. There are no deep harmonic progressions or virtuosities, but rather short riffs and simple choruses that you’ll start to enjoy, and to hum, since the very first listenings.

You can read from here the review of Stuffed & Ready that was previously published on the blog.

Cherry Glazerr is an American rock band from Los Angeles, California, United States, formed in 2013. The band today is a trio which consists of Clementine Creevy (lead vocals and guitar), Tabor Allen (drums) and Devin O’Brien (bass). Clementine Creevy is the only member from the original formation.


#3) “Queen Zee”, by Queen Zee

Punk Rock / Alternative Rock
“Queen Zee” is the first LP from the homonymous band. The album was released on released February 8, 2019.

Queen Zee is a relatively new rock band from Liverpool, which has gained increased attention for their extremely chaotic and irreverent approach to music. Their songs are rough and dirty, but the band seems to have found the secret for transforming everything they play into something fun and catchy. And their music is so sticky that even if their songs are new, it’s like you had already known them for a long time.

The band’s debut LP provide the listener with an intriguing mix of Nirvana-type grunge and classic punk, with also other influences from alternative rock and hard rock. And the result is something absolutely energetic and also fairly original. This is definitely a band to monitor.

You can read from here the review of the LP.

Queen Zee consists of Davine (lead vocals, piano and guitar), JTB (lead guitar and occasional keyboards), Frankie Wortho (bass guitar), ‘Furious’ Dave Bloom (drums and percussion), Smash Molly (vocals, synthesizer and tambourine)


#2) “De Facto” by Lorelle Meets The Obsolete

Psychedelic Rock
“De Facto” is the fifth album released by the band Lorelle Meets the Obsolete. It was published on January 11th, 2019.

One of the most surprising albums I heard so far in 2019 is De Facto, the fifth album by the Mexican formation Lorelle Meets The Obsolete.

The recipe of De Facto is fairly simple: you put in a blender a large dose of psychedelic rock from the ’70s and a couple of abundant cups of dream pop. But beyond the single ingredients, it is the excellent technique mastered by the musicians which managed to guarantee for the album the perfect balance between psychedelic experimentations and moments of pure ambient poetry.

Sonically speaking the album is truly amazing. De Facto was recorded in Ensenada, Baja California, in a home-made recording studio and it’s surprising how from such amateurish environment it was possible to record a kind of music that seems so universal, and capable to cross the boundaries of many different genres.

The album was included in the category of S.B.G.’s Best New Music and you can find here my review of the album.

Lorelle Meets the Obsolete consists of Lorena Quintanilla (“Lorelle”) and Alberto González (“The Obsolete”). Lorelle is the singer of the band and she plays also electric guitar, synths, combo organ and percussion. The Obsolete play: electric guitar, synths, combo organ and percussion.


Best Rock Album of 2019 so far

“It Won/t Be Like This All the Time”, by The Twilight Sad

Indie Rock

The first thing which emerges when one listens to the new record from The Twilight Sad is that this band never ceases to evolve and to adapt their style of rock as they become more mature. The band debuted at the beginning of their career with a heavy post-punk altered by industrial and noise elements, and they arrived today, through an articulate journey, to play an experimental version of indie rock that’s full of melodies and enriched with new wave nuances. And listening to their new record, named It Won/t Be Like This All the Time, it’s easy to say that the last musical incarnation of the Scottish band is absolutely brilliant and exciting.

An impressive characteristic of the new album is the remarkable number of truly memorable songs that it contains. And this is what makes the LP truly enjoyable and interesting independently from any consideration about the evolution of the band’s style. It Won/t Be Like This All the Time is objectively a real masterpiece of modern rock and one of the best albums of the band’s discography.

It was easy to assign to The Twilight Sad the title of the best rock act of this first part of the year, and I believe that we have already one of the contenders for the best rock formation of 2019, if not the best among all genres.

The album was included in the category of S.B.G.’s Best New Music and you can find here my review of the album.

The Twilight Sad today consists of James Alexander Graham (vocals), Andy MacFarlane (guitar), Johnny Docherty (bass), Brendan Smith (keyboards) and Sebastien Schultz (drums). The latter replaced the historic band’s drummer Mark Devine, who had participated in all the band’s previous albums.


There are many playlists about Rock among those I’m curating on Spotify, basically one for each of the main sub-genres of rock. Today I’m recommending to you to have a look onto a couple of them, namely INDIE INSIDE (with the best and latest indie rock songs) and REBEL INSIDE (with the best of punk rock). Enjoy!


The PSYCHOROCK Radar (Episode #1/2019)

It would seem a coincidence, but judging from what happened this year and last year, one could say that the first months of the year are particularly good for psychedelic rock. In these first weeks of 2019, we had, in fact, a series of important publications relevant to the psychorock genre. In this article, I have selected four of these, which provide an excellent representation of the state of this genre of music in contemporary times.

As far as geography is concerned, we have one album from Mexico (Lorelle Meets the Obsolete), two from England (Ed Wynne, The Telescopes), and one from South Africa (Zoo Lake).

This article features a selection of records released between the beginning of the year and mid-February 2019, stay tuned for future updates.



“De Facto” by Lorelle Meets The Obsolete

One of the most surprising albums I heard so far in 2019 is De Facto, the fifth album by the Mexican formation Lorelle Meets The Obsolete.

The recipe of De Facto is fairly simple: you put in a blender a large dose of psychedelic rock from the ’70s and a couple of abundant cups of dream pop. But beyond the single ingredients, it is the excellent technique mastered by the musicians which managed to guarantee for the album the perfect balance between psychedelic experimentations and moments of pure ambient poetry.

Sonically speaking the album is truly amazing. De Facto was recorded in Ensenada, Baja California, in a home-made recording studio and it’s surprising how from such amateurish environment it was possible to record a kind of music that seems so universal, and capable to cross the boundaries of many different genres.

De Facto was admitted within the prestigious club of S.B.G.’s Best New Music, and you can read from here the full review of the album



“Shimmer into Nature” by Ed Wynne

It’s relatively easy to introduce and describe the music of Ed Wynne‘s new LP, since it’s basically the same kind of instrumental progressive rock that he’s playing since 35 years, with all the usual heavy influences from jazz fusion, ethnic electronica, world music, and psychedelia. In synthesis: Ozric Tentacles.

Shimmer into Nature, Wynne’s new solo LP, features five long instrumental tracks which are all very nice to hear, well played and recorded, even if it suffers the same problems of Ozric Tentacle’s more recent records: pure layers of electronic and ethnic sounds without any real construction of a song.

If you want more details about the album, you can access my dedicated review from here.



“Exploding Head Syndrome”, by The Telescopes

The music played by English rock band The Telescopes seems made to confirm what I’m saying since many years (which is also the overarching concept of my blog): good music is based on a few universal features that are mostly independent of the particular genre that you are listening in a specific moment. It may be rock, electronic, metal or jazz, but there will be always some common characteristics that allow the best song to excel over the others. These characteristics, I believe, are deeply connected to how our body and our mind interact with that physical phenomenon that we call music.

Exploding Head Syndrome, which is the tenth LP from The Telescopes, fits very well with this concept because if we could make the experiment of substituting the uninterrupted and punctuated layer of electronic drones with thick and distorted guitars, and at the same time replacing Stephen Lawrie‘s whispered lyrics with some growling death metal voice, you would end up with a pack of songs that would not look bad inside an album by Conan. In the new album from The Telescopes there is, in fact, a persistent obsessiveness and a mesmerizing rhythmic component that transcends the boundaries of psychedelic and noise rock. This is at the same time the most interesting aspect of the LP, but also one of the elements that make the album relatively difficult to be appreciated in its entirety, in one single run from the start to the end of the record. After a few songs you need some rest, or to move to something else, otherwise, the constant and mechanical synthetic beat of these songs will anaesthetize your senses.

Exploding Head Syndrome may be a very good album, but taken in small doses.



“Zonk”, by Zoo Lake

I’m concluding this roundup with a curious and fairly original album called Zonk, released by the South African rock band Zoo Lake. This quartet of musicians describes their music as “a sonic onslaught somewhere between stochastic no-wave and hypnotic post-punk“. Leaving aside the questions about what they meant by stochastic (I studied stochastic processes for several years), the songs on this record are effectively unconventional and, to some extent, hypnotizing.

In Zonk you’ll find noises, weird samples, lots of distortions, psychedelic effects and hallucinated voices, all mixed together in short songs that still manage to maintain a logical sense and, surprisingly, a certain linearity. One thing that typically gives consistency to various tracks is the bass line, which draws the path from which all the other sounds departs for their excursions into noise.

Zonk is really an intriguing and quite an original record, which manages to be experimental but still enjoyable and nice to listen to.



Many of the above-mentioned artists are contributing to YELLOW EYES, the playlist with the best of modern progressive and art rock. Check it out!


“Queen Zee” by Queen Zee

My initial reaction when I came across the debut LP from Queen Zee was a bit like going on a roller coaster: the very first time I listened to the album I was astounded (what an incredible debut is this one!!!) and I immediately started sharing the link to the album with a lot of friends on WhatsApp, whereupon I entered a phase where I partially reconsidered the value of the individual songs and I commenced to feel a weaker connection with the album, until I eventually reached a more balanced position between these two extremes, which is where I am at this time.

Queen Zee is a “pink pop punk band” from Liverpool with an approach to music that’s extremely chaotic and irreverent. Their songs are rough and dirty, but absolutely fun and catchy. In some ways, this LP has reminded me of one of my greatest passions in rock music, which is the band Turbonegro. Similarly to the case of the Norwegian masters of rock, Queen Zee must have discovered a magical recipe which makes all of their songs immediately engaging and exciting to hear, and that’s why the first encounter with their debut LP can leave you breathless. You feel in fact a strange sensation: this music is so sticky and catchy that even if the songs are new, it’s like you had already known them for a long time.


From a musical point of view, to obtain music like this you can imagine putting in a blender a couple of cups of Nirvana-type grunge, a half pint of classic punk, a few tablespoons of alternative rock and a pinch of hard rock. Beat everything together, then pour on top some incisive lyrics and serve.


Of course, the record has some flaws. For example, sometimes the level of madness grows dangerously up to the risk of becoming confused with stupidity, or antipathy, but it’s something we can accept because it remains the first full-length work from an extremely promising band. And it’s also the first good LP of punk rock that I really enjoyed this year, and therefore I feel particularly tolerant. I’m giving to this record a rating of 7.5/10.

My favourite songs are Sissy Fists, Idle Crown, I Hate Your New Boyfriend, Victim Age and the opening track Loner.

Queen Zee’s debut LP is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed also from Spotify.



Songs from Queen Zee are now featured in a couple of playlists among those I curate on Spotify, i.e. REBEL INSIDE (the best of new punk rock) and ALT ROCK ARENA (the best of new alternative rock). Check these out and follow!


Quick Review: “Stuffed & Ready” by Cherry Glazerr

In the short time span of just a few years, there have been so many line-up changes within the American rock band Cherry Glazer, that it has become basically a one-woman project. Singer and guitarist Clementine Creevy, who’s the undisputed leader of the band, is also the only member of the original formation. Actually, it’s only thanks to her dedication and efforts that the band managed not only to cope with such a continuous alternation of supporting musicians but also to keep writing and recording catchy and cheerful indie rock songs.

On the early days of February, Cherry Glazer have dropped their third LP, Stuffed & Ready, which features a good combination of indie and garage rock, conveying an enjoyable sense of immediacy and authenticity. And even if we’re not dealing with particularly memorable and profound pieces, it’s very easy to be influenced by the rebellious and slightly sarcastic spirit of these songs, also because the new record shows a tangible shift towards indie pop sounds which certainly guarantees a more direct and immediate impact, at least in the short term.


Stuffed & Ready is a nice album, with a number of particularly intriguing and catchy songs (like That’s Not My Real Life, Stupid Fish and the single Juicy Socks). In more general terms, one of the most enjoyable aspects of the LP is the apparent ease with which Clementine Creevy manages to play motifs for her guitar that stick to your hears and which result, in most of the cases, extremely nice and engaging. There are no deep harmonic progressions or virtuosities, but rather short riffs and simple choruses that you’ll start to enjoy, and to hum, since the very first listenings. Which is really what you expect from this genre of music. In this sense, I’m giving to Stuffed & Ready a convinced rating of 7/10.


The album is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed also from Spotify.



Songs from Stuffed & Ready are now featured in INDIE INSIDE, the playlist with only the best and newest songs in Indie Rock. Listen to it, follow it, and spread the word!


Quick Review: “Shimmer into Nature” by Ed Wynne

There was a period in my life when I was really into Ozric Tentacles: I was collecting many of their CDs and I also had a couple of opportunities to see them playing live in Italy. Attending their gigs made me understand how central and crucial was the role of Ed Wynne in the sound of the band. He was not only playing his psychedelic guitar, but he was actually doing a lot of other stuff with keyboards and synths. It was not a surprise for me, then, that the kind of music that Ed Wynne is now releasing under his solo project has the same sound and feeling of Ozric Tentacles. To be more precise, it’s almost impossible to find any real difference between the material that he has recorded for his new solo LP Shimmer into Nature and the music featured in the last couple of albums by the Ozrics.

Based on the above, it’s relatively easy to introduce and describe the music of Wynne’s new LP, since it’s basically the same kind of instrumental progressive rock that he’s playing since 35 years, with all the usual heavy influences from jazz fusion, ethnic electronica, world music, and psychedelia. In synthesis: Ozric Tentacles.


If the sound of Wynne’s new project is the replica of Ozric Tentacle’s one, unfortunately the same applies to the quality of the music. I was a great fan of the Ozrics and, as said, was absolutely into their music. Nevertheless, I’ve always felt that their last good album is 1999’s Waterfall Cities, the eightieth album of a large discography which now counts 15 LPs, 10 official live records, and many other releases like compilations, remix albums, and EPs. At some point of their career, the English band stopped writing actual “songs” and they started proposing flat pieces of music without any internal development, structure, or everything else that could really differentiate one song from another.

Shimmer into Nature makes no difference: five long instrumental tracks which are all very nice to hear, well played and recorded, but there is no trace, albeit minimal, of what could be considered as a song. Pure layers of electronic and ethnic sounds and, on top, jazz-like psychedelic improvisations. Perfect as a background, but not much more than that.

My overall rating for the LP is 6/10. Favorite track: Oddplonk.


Shimmer into Nature can be streamed from Spotify.


The INDIE ROCK Radar (Episode #1/2019)

The month of January 2019 was definitely live and interesting for the lovers of rock music, in particular for what concerns the sub-world of independent and experimental indie rock. I’m presenting in this article the key events that happened so far and I’m doing it by introducing those album which, according to my opinion, have been the most interesting releases of the first weeks of the new year.

As usual, that’s not intended to be a report of everything that was published all over the world, but it’s still a good selection of the most relevant events in indie rock. In this respect, as far as geography is concerned, we have one band from England (TOY), one from Scotland (The Twilight Sad), one from Australia (Married Man), one from U.S. (Deerhunter) and even one from Brazil (George Belasco & O Cão Andaluz).

Let’s start with the review and stay tuned for future episodes!



“It Won/t Be Like This All the Time”, by The Twilight Sad

If I look back and analyze what happened in the world of indie rock in this first month of the year, it’s easy to say that the most important event was the publication of the new album of the Scottish band The Twilight Sad: It Won/t Be Like This All the Time.

This LP is a real masterpiece of modern rock, and one of the best of the band’s discography. I believe that we have already one of the contenders for the best rock album of 2019, if not the best among of all genres. I have published a full review of the LP, you can check it out.



“Hard Bargain”, by Married Man

Initially started as the solo project of Sydney musician and artist Sarafina Pea, the indie rock project Married Man has become a three-piece formation with bassist Kim Sukit and drummer Marnie Vaughn who recently entered as permanent members of the band. Hard Bargain, the newest album of Married Man, is also the first with the new lineup.

The music played by Married Man is extremely scratchy, rough and with a decidedly low-fi approach. Basically, it looks like someone took a post-punk record and played it in slow motion. The final effect is that of a caress on the cheek but made with sandpaper. Nevertheless, the songs ofHard Bargain possess a special charm and they bring a sense of genuineness, freshness and immediacy that nowadays may be considered precious qualities for a rock album, especially if we count how many pre-packaged and anaesthetized records are released worldwide. And beyond the initial hostility that one can feel for a style of music that’s so little warm and welcoming, there is something special in this music that keeps you listen to it again and again.



“Os Cães Veem Coisas”, by George Belasco & O Cão Andaluz

It is definitely uncommon, at least here in the Old Continent, to listen to an album from Brazil that’s not extreme metal nor jazz or world music. That’s why I was very intrigued when Bandcamp proposed in its weekly selection this work by George Belasco & O Cão Andaluz, called Os Cães Veem Coisas (“Dogs see things”).

This is actually a very nice, fresh and curious album which puts together many different influences, from garage rock to punk to surf rock, all played with an “indie” feeling that gives immediacy and catchiness to all of the tracks, despite their experimental nature.



“Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?”, by Deerhunter

One of the most anticipated released for early 2019 was Deerhunter‘s new album Why Hasn’t Everything Already Disappeared?, released by the American rock band in the second decade of January. The LP signs the definitive incorporation in the band’s style of psycho-pop sounds, despite the songs still present a persistent sense of restlessness which makes their pieces quite complicated to be assimilated in the first listenings.

In general, if we exclude a couple of more catchy and enjoyable songs, I have the impression that the lyrical and atmospheric aspects of Deerhunter’s music have taken a much prominent role when compared to the purely melodic and musical ones. For this reason, I’m struggling to get connected with this LP. Maybe, with time, the opinion will change for the better.



“Happy in the Hollow”, by TOY

Let’s conclude this first edition of the INDIE RADAR with a brand new release from the UK: it’s Happy in the Hollow, the fourth LP by British five-piece band TOY. The album maybe is not the best of their discography so far, but it still manages to achieve that fascinating combination of indie rock and psychedelic music that the band has pursued since their formation. The result is definitely interesting and many songs are animated by an internal dynamic that makes them feel fresh, alive and absolutely intriguing to hear.

I’ve published a dedicated review of the album, you can read it from here.



If you’re a lover of indie rock you can’t miss the playlist INDIE INSIDE, which collects all the best and newest releases. Listen to it, follow it (it’s continuously updated), and spread the word!



Quick Review: “Happy in the Hollow” by TOY

There are records which tries to achieve the ambitious goal of pursuing an experimental and progressive approach whilst still adopting a musical language which remains accessible and enjoyable to hear. Happy in the Hollow, which is the fourth and newest LP by British band TOY, aims at this result with a special recipe that foresees equal parts of indie rock and psychedelic music. The result is certainly interesting and many songs on the new album are effectively animated by an internal dynamic that makes them alive and absolutely intriguing.


From a musical point of view, Happy in the Hollow is an album made of contrasts: basic rock riffs combined with psychedelic elements, scratchy sounds and angelic voices, and also the combination of acoustic instruments with electronic inserts. This is not a record made to be appreciated as a quick shot, but it’s certainly intriguing and nice to be explored with patience and curiosity. Even the atmospheres of the songs are never completely defined: in the most “serene” pieces there is something which leaves a taste of restlessness and claustrophobia, just as in the darker pieces we always see some light which is shining on the horizon.


Among the aspects that have not convinced me completely there is the sound of the songs. The choice to produce and record the LP in a completely independent way certainly courageous, but the final result presents those typical imperfections and coarseness to which we are no longer accustomed to.

In short, TOY’s new album is full of ideas and it sparks of creativity, but it also requires a certain dedication to be fully appreciated. The five-piece from Brighton continues to experiment and evolve their style of psychedelic indie rock, and despite their latest work isn’t maybe the most immediate and catchy among those they published to date, Happy in the Hollow still remains a valuable and very nice album. My overall rating is 6.5/10.

My favorite songs are Energy, Mechanism and the opening track Sequence One.


Happy in the Hollow is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed also from Spotify.



TOY are now featured in INDIE INSIDE, the playlist with all the best and newest songs in Indie Rock. More than 60 songs among those released in the last couple of years. Check it out!



Best New Music: “It Won/t Be Like This All the Time” by The Twilight Sad

There are bands whose career has been marked by many stylistic shifts but that have still preserved a recognizable and excellent quality of musical production. Among these formations we can certainly count The Twilight Sad: the band debuted at the beginning of their career with a heavy post-punk altered by industrial and noise elements, and they arrived today, through an articulate journey, to play an experimental version of indie rock that’s full of melodies and enriched with new wave nuances. In these cases, every fan usually feels more connected to a specific phase of the band’s career and lives with trepidation the release of a new album, trying to imagine how much the new material will be closer – or distant – with respect to his “favourite record”. From a more external and objective point of view (as it is mine, in this case), these changes of style are observed with less apprehension and much more curiosity. And coming back to the specific case of The Twilight Sad’s new record, named It Won/t Be Like This All the Time, it’s easy to say that the last musical incarnation of the Scottish band is absolutely brilliant and exciting.

“It Won/t Be Like This All the Time” is the fifth studio album by The Twilight Sad. The LP was released by Rock Action Records on 18 January 2019.

The first impressive characteristic of the new album is the remarkable number of truly memorable songs that it contains. There are at least 6 tracks that you would like to listen again and again, for how they are catchy and moving. And this is the reason why the album is so enjoyable and interesting independently from any consideration about the evolution of the band’s style. Very often, when I hear people talking about music, it seems to me that they forget that the ultimate objective of this art is to generate emotions in the listener and, if possible, to make him dream with his eyes open. An album like It Won/t Be Like This All the Time reconciles us with the very essence of contemporary music: it’s first and foremost a collection of superb rock songs. All the other disquisitions whether it’s noise folk rather than experimental or post-punk take on very little importance.


From a stylistic point of view, the songs of the album are built on a combination of multiple constituting elements. The first, in my view, is the work that has been made by Andy MacFarlane, who draws with his guitar sequence of chords, melodic lines or even distorted sounds that are always interesting and also relatively unconventional. The walls of noise that he was used to playing in the band’s early works have left the field to lighter, but absolutely moving sounds. It’s almost unbelievable to realize that in many songs of the album it seems, at first, that the guitars have disappeared. But as soon as we focus our attention it’s easy to verify that not only MacFarlane’s dreamy guitar is absolutely present, but that with its enveloping sound it’s actually one of the main sources of that atmospheric feel which impregnate every song.

Guitarist and producer Andy MacFarlane is one of the two remaining founding members of The Twilight Sad.

Another key element of the band’s today style is a tangible and persistent presence of delicate layers of synths, which are always dosed with great balance and elegance. This is combined with an effective rhythm section, which is as beautiful as it’s simple and linear. This is also the component of the band’s style which recalls the most the influences from new wave: clean bass lines, repeated notes, tight compact battery, all it’s really fantastic to me. Finally, but not least, the deep and expressive voice of James Alexander Graham, who’s absolutely inspired in this record.


When combining together so many positive elements, it’s easy to obtain an album so exciting as It Won/t Be Like This All the Time. And if I think that not so many years ago the guys from Kilsyth were seriously thinking about calling it quits, we must really be grateful to them for they changed their minds.

The Twilight Sad today consists of James Alexander Graham (vocals), Andy MacFarlane (guitar), Johnny Docherty (bass), Brendan Smith (keyboards) and Sebastien Schultz (drums). The latter replaced the historic band’s drummer Mark Devine, who had participated in all the band’s previous albums.

My overall rating for the album is 9/10. It’s a real masterpiece of modern rock, and one of the best of the band’s discography. I believe that we have already one of the contenders for the best rock album of 2019, if not the best among all genres.

My favourite songs are VTr, Girl Chewing Gum, The Arbor, Let/s Get Lost, Auge/Maschine, and the opening track [10 Good Reasons for Modern Drugs].

It Won/t Be Like This All the Time is available for streaming on Spotify.



Songs from It Won/t Be Like This All the Time are now featured in INDIE INSIDE, the playlist with the best of new indie rock. Check it out and follow it!


Best New Music: “De Facto” by Lorelle Meets The Obsolete

If someone asked me what result we would get by putting in a blender a large dose of 70s psychedelic rock and a couple of abundant cups of dream pop, I would probably reply with something close to the new album from the Mexican duo Lorelle Meets The Obsolete. Lorena Quintanilla and Alberto González, the two masterminds behind this particular music project, have just published one of those records that really defies classifications. The band’s new album, called De Facto, contains a wide spectrum of styles that gravitate between the most extreme psychedelic experimentations and moments of pure ambient poetry.

“De Facto” is Lorelle Meets The Obsolete‘s new album, released on January 11, 2019.

De Facto is the fifth album released by Quintanilla and González, and it’s apparently the one where the two artists have left more freedom to their musical inspirations, exploiting a palette of sounds and atmospheres that range among apparently distant points of the musical universe. The result is absolutely brilliant, especially because the songs of the album are amazing and impressive not only for their originality but really because of the emotional intensity they bring to the listener.

Lorena Quintanilla (“Lorelle”) and Alberto González (“The Obsolete”).

In order to fully appreciate the music of De Facto, however, the listener really needs to get rid of any preconception and absorb the songs that arrive one after the other as they come, without trying to find familiar patterns or frameworks. Without this openness of spirit you would not be able to transition from a first track like Ana, distressing and almost trascendental with its slow and ineluctable pulsating rhythm, to a second track like Lineas en Hojas, which starts as a K-pop dreamy hit, and then evolves. The experience may be a little unsettling, there is no doubt about it, but the absolute value of music keeps everything tight and compact, with a constant sense of emotional suspension that manages to hold together moments that, at first sightm, could seem so loudly distant one each other.


Sonically speaking the album is truly amazing. De Facto was recorded in Ensenada, Baja California, in a home-made recording studio that the duo built with their roommate and touring synth player, José Orozco, after finishing the tour for their 2017’s LP Balance. To some extent, it’s surprising to realize that the music composed in a relatively amateurish recording studio has managed to become so universal, something capable to cross the boundaries of all the genres that we have heard to date.

If I should try to give some coordinates for describing the music of the LP, I would say that the songs of De Facto have a central core of psychedelic rock based on synthesizers and guitars, which are also the main instruments played by Quintanilla and González. The combination of dreamy vocals over psychedelic rock is one of the conducting threads that hold together the various pieces of the LP. In some tracks, such as the long song Unificado, it’s really the central component of the song, but in many other tracks it’s just one of the various contributors to the overal atmosphere. From this psychedelic baseline, the various songs of the disc depart freely through different and often amazing paths. A group of skilled musicians contributed to the composition of the LP, including the aforementioned Orozco on synths and organ, drummer Andrea Davi and bassist Fernando Nuti. Lorena Quintanilla has stated on several occasions that the songs of De Facto were conceived and originated with a “band approach” rather than starting from individual ideas. This is presumably another reason why we enjoy in the final product such a variety of tones and styles.

I started my review talking about a shake of 70s rock and dream pop. Other critics have compared this music to what happens when musical experimentation passes through a heavy psych filter. Both these descriptions are quite evocative but, in the end, they don’t fully render the complexity, the brilliance and also the freshness of this music. What’s certain and indisputable is that De Facto is an outstanding record. I give it a rating of 8/10.

De Facto is available on Bandcamp and it can be streamed from Spotify.

My favorite songs are the opening track Ana, the psychedelic hymn Unificado, the closing song La Maga, but also the intriguing Lineas en Hojas with its hypnotic bass loop.


Lorelle And The Obsolete are now featured in YELLOW EYES, the playlist with the best of contemporary progressive rock.



Best New Music: “John Garcia and the Band of Gold” by John Garcia

The beginning of 2019 has been particularly generous for the fans of stoner music: we have just received, just like a late Christmas present, the new album from one of the most important, influential and acclaimed figures of the stoner scene. I’m referring to John Garcia, the voice of the desert, the American vocalist and songwriter who has illuminated with his shining talent the world of stoner in the last thirty years.

John Garcia’s musical career has been marked by many important phases: he founded the legendary band Kyuss and after that experience he contributed to many other formations such as Unida, Slo Burn, Hermano and Vista Chino.

John Garcia performing live with Kyuss in 1995. You can see in the picture the band’s guitarist Josh Homme, who later founded the rock band Queens of the Stone Age.

Approximately five years ago, the singer from Arizona started a solo career which has already seen the release of three studio records: 2014’s self-titled LP John Garcia, 2017’s The Coyote Who Spoke in Tongues (where Garcia presented in a totally acoustic arrangement a bunch of new tracks and some of Kyuss’ legendary songs) and, finally, this year’s John Garcia And The Band Of Gold.

John Garcia’s third and latest LP: “John Garcia and the Band of Gold”

As soon as I started listening to the new record I immediately realized that this wasn’t just John Garcia’s latest LP. This album, in fact, could likely represent a turning point in the career of the American musician. John Garcia And The Band Of Gold shows a tangible shift towards hard rock and southern sounds and, in this respect, the album represents a relative departure from the classical “stoner metal” of Garcia’s previous releases. John Garcia And The Band Of Gold is therefore one of those records that you have to listen and enjoy without making continuous comparisons with the artist’s previous discography. Let me be more precise: if the operation of evaluating this new album in the overarching context of Garcia’s career is absolutely normal, especially for long-term fans (as I am), I believe that expecting from each new song written by Garcia to be the new Gardenia is wrong, and it doesn’t make any justice to the phisiological evolution of Garcia’s music, and the evolutionary process that he has undertaken in the last few years. I repeat: this has nothing to do with the overall appreciation of the new album, for which everyone is free to say whatever he wants. This is rather my humble recommendation: to approach the new LP by taking into account that, in its essence, this is basically a record of contemporary hard rock with stoner influences. And it’s no coincidence, therefore, that the part of the album that’s closer to classic stoner is the final one, in which the band reinterprets in an “electric” way the unpublished songs that were initially presented in Garcia’s fully acoustic LP The Coyote Who Spoke in Tongues.

John Garcia today.

Once made the necessary recommendations, let’s now focus on the new material released by our beloved singer. The first thing to say about John Garcia And The Band Of Gold is that the record is incredibly fresh, bright and also fun. There are many positive elements about Garcia’s new effort, but the thing that impressed me since the beginning has been the stylistic coherence of the LP. The album has a compactness out of the ordinary and it emanates a sense of confidence that honestly we couldn’t find when Garcia started his solo career. Compared to the music contained in 2014’s Garcia’s debut as leader, the artist today seems to have calibrated much better his style and he’s in condition to offer a collection of songs that go straight and without any hesitation along the road he has now chosen to follow for his music. There are no drops of tension, no dramatic changes of atmosphere, nor even the usual alternation of ballads and heavy pieces that we’ve listened in Garcia’s debut. The new record is like a car that runs fast along the straight and hot roads of Arizona (I’ve never been in that part of the US, but this is how I imagine the roads there). Clearly there is the risk that in the long run the LP could suffer for a relative lack of internal dynamics, but at least in this first phase of listening the compactness of the songs seems to prevails over everything else, and it makes the album absolutely exciting and enjoyable to listen to.


The majority of the tracks of the LP are characterized by simple but extremely appealing riffs, which result at the same time accessible and engaging. The album is immediate and ready to be assimilated already from the first listenings, but it doesn’t lose brilliance even after several runs in the stereo. For sure Garcia and his loyal bandmates (who are basically the same musicians that gravitated around him in the last few years) know very well how to win the hearts of the fans, and they do it on every new album. As a matter of fact, there are artists that have the capacity to write riffs and choruses that stick into the listener’s memory just from the first times you listen to them, and John Garcia is one of those. A few songs, in particular, have all the credentials to become new classics in his vast discography and they have also the potential to excite the audiences of the singer’s future live shows.


If I had to highlight a negative aspect of the record, I would have expected something more for the vocal part. John Garcia has one of the most beautiful and recognizable voices of rock and listening to him while he sings is always one of the most rewarding experiences for a stoner enthusiast (I have seen him live three times, and I can say that in the recent years, under this point of view, he is really in great shape). Nevertheless, in this last record I feel like Garcia has put on show all of his usual repertoire, which is really much stuff, but without ever surprising us with something unique and new.


In conclusion: John Garcia and the Band of Gold is another precious entry within the discography of one of the greatest musicians of all times, and not only within the stoner scene. It provides many elements of innovation to keep alive the interest of the long-term fans of the artists, and for the same reason presumably he will disappoint a few of them. The direction of Garcia’s music as band leader is now clear and his performance as singer is solid and brilliant, despite I would have preferred something new also on this aspect. Finally, the songs of the new album have a level of accessibility and immediacy that make the LP as a good entry point even for those who aren’t familiar with the previous production from Garcia.

If I should express my rating, I would say 8/10.

The album can be streamed from Bandcamp and Spotify.

My favorite songs: Chicken Delight, Apache Junction, Jim’s Whiskers, Popcorn, Don’t Even Think About It and the opening instrumental track Space Vato.



Songs from the album John Garcia and the Band of Gold are featured in DUST AND SAND and THE DELICATE SOUND OF THUNDER, the two playlist I’m curating on Spotify with the best of new stoner music. Listen, follow and spread the word!



WHATCHAWANT – Music from the Golden Age (Part 1)


I believe it’s absolutely natural that we feel a special and visceral connection with the music that we used to listen when we were teenagers. When we compare it with the music that’s produced today, older tunes always look more strong, exciting, and also original than what the new generations are listening nowadays. Nevertheless, it’s objectively agreed that across the 80s and 90s an incredible phenomenon was experienced in which artists from different backgrounds began to expand the boundaries of their music by mixing genres and cultures, creating something unique and spectacular, which today still shines with a special light. Bands like Rage Against The Machine, Beastie Boys, Linkin Park, they all contributed to sign one of the most influential periods of the history of modern music. I call it “The Golden Age of Music“.

WHATCHAWANT is a project which is aimed at selecting, collecting and mixing together the music that was produced in the Golden Age of Music. You’ll find here only the best songs, those who influenced huge masses of fans and followers.

PART 1 is the first chapter of the project. It’s a mix of 30 minutes with an initial bunch of songs. Other parts will follow. Enjoy it and spread the word!