One Album per Day. Volume 2 (13-24)

Readers of this blog who follow me on Twitter already know that I got into the habit, on almost every morning, to propose an album selected among those released in the recent past, of which I also provide the link to Spotify and a very short introductory note, short enough to fit into the 280 characters of the tweet. This started because I spend a lot of time browsing into the music released in the past years and sometimes I meet (or discover) something particularly interesting and meaningful. I wanted to find a way to keep track for myself of these valuable albums and soon I started writing down the links to these albums and, for each one, just a few brief sentences for helping me remember what caught my attention and why I thought it was important to keep the memory of that particular album. At some point I thought it could be nice to share these notes with my small group of followers, and from the reactions I recorded so far there are many of them who appreciate my daily posts with the “Album of the Day”.

The first dozen of selected albums is available here. In this post I collect the second group of records. As usual, take this list as a potential inspiration for putting something new on your music player. Enjoy!


 

#13) Kronos QuartetFolk Songs (2017). Kronos has become one of the world’s most celebrated and influential ensembles. Folk Songs is the quartet’s emotional exploration of the folk world.


 

#14) PolyrhythmicsCaldera (2017). Rich with bold brass and hypnotic percussions, Polyrhythmics showcase their impressive skills through a singular blend of funk, soul, rock, jazz and afrobeat.


 

#15) Arthur Vint & AssociatesDeath Rides A Horse (2017). Drummer Arthur Vint recasts into a jazz setting the music of Ennio Morricone, adapting the western tunes for his 9 piece ensemble.


 

#16) Robert HaighCreatures of the Deep (2017). A beautiful album of piano driven ambient music from British composer Robert Haigh, filled with noir, minimal, and neo-classical landscapes.


 

#17) TootArdLaissez passer (2017). This five-piece ensemble comes from the contested region of Golan Heights between Israel and Syria and plays a brilliant blend of Arabic and African styles with American funk influences.


 

#18) Enrico Pieranunzi, André Ceccarelli, Diego ImbertMénage à trois (2016). In this beautiful album the three masters mix masterfully jazz and classical music, in a way that neither one prevails over the other.


 

#19) Bruce BrubakerHope Street Tunnel Blues: Music for Piano by Philip Glass & Alvin Curran (2007). Brubaker executes pieces which highlight the expressive possibilities of Glass’ and Curran’s minimalism.


 

#20) Allison PierceYear of the Rabbit (2017). This album launched Allison Pierce’ solo career after that the folk singer spent two decades recording and performing with her sister Catherine as The Pierces.


 

#21) Erik LevanderHalv (2016). The dark Swedish romantic artits composed a haunting album which blurs the boundaries of acoustic, analogue and digital music, This is high-quality mood music for those who keep getting lost.


 

#22) Benny AnderssonPiano (2017).  The former member of Swedish pop masters ABBA showcases his classical sensibility with these touching and emotional pieces for piano solo.


 

#23) Skatalites: Independence Ska And The Far East Sound (2017). A stunning compilation from the greatest ska band of all times, The Skaltalities, from Jamaica.


 

#24) Saeid Shanbehzadeh, Rostam Mirlashari, Naghib Shanbehzadeh, Manu CodjiaPour-Afrigha (2017). Bagpipes, saxophones, jazz guitar, percussions and the magnificent voice of Rostam Mirlashari: the true sound of Africa.


 

 

ONE ALBUM PER DAY (or almost that). Volume 1 (1-12)

The readers of this blog who follow me also on Twitter have noticed that from the beginning of this year I got into the habit, on every morning, to propose an album of the recent past, of which I also provide the link to Spotify and a very short introductory note, short enough to fit into the 280 characters of the tweet.

This started because very often I start listening to some music and then I find myself jumping from one artist to the next according to different logics, until I find a record that I find particularly interesting and meaningful. This is often an album that I missed or just left behind. I wanted to find a way to keep track of these records. quickly and easily, and soon I found myself writing down the links to these albums and, for each one, just a few brief sentences for helping me remember what caught my attention and why I thought it was important to keep the memory of that particular album. At that point I thought it could be nice to share these notes with my small group of followers, and for the reactions that I’m now seeing from these short posts on Twitter I can really say that there are many of them who appreciate my daily post.

In this article of the blog I report the first 12 albums which were recommended since the beginning of 2018. I hope this could be another way to give visibility and knowledge for these beautiful records and I believe that it can be also fun to scroll the list and maybe get an idea for putting some nice music in the background. Enjoy!


#1) Various ArtistsHendrix in the Spirit of Jazz (2017). Countless musicians in rock, pop and jazz have been influenced by Hendrix, and many have overtly based their own music on his.


 

#2) The Black Market Trust –  Folk Songs (2017). Through their handsome vocals and timeless melodies, the Los Angeles-based gypsy jazz band revisits classical melodies, gypsy waltzes and traditional acoustic folk songs.


 

#3) Lena NymarkTrapped In The Silence (2017). The Norwegian artist brings the issue of silence of our lives through innocent and disarming atmospheres, dipped in reserved melancholy.


 

#4) Lena NataliaAlmost Home (2017). In her last album, composer and pianist Lena Natalia draws a musical painting that is vividly impressive in its inspiring dimensions and aesthetics.


 

#5) Encuentro Tango QuintetCarta a Mi Amada (2017). The album features both original music of Angelo Petronio and the covers of the great classics of tango and milonga, all imprinted with lightness, inviting us to break free and dance.


 

#6) Luigi RubinoIl Soffio e la Luce (2016). Luigi Rubino is an exquisite and elegant Neapolitan pianist who recorded in this album 14 tracks of supreme beauty.


 

#7) Daniel HerskedalThe Roc (2017). The Norwegian Jazz tubist conducts a quintet of artists, fusing a unique mix of influences from folk, jazz, classical and Arabic music.


 

#8) Lorenzo MasottoWhite Materials (2017). The 4th full-lenght album released by the Italian composer fuses ambient atmospheres and classical fragments into a wonderful collection of delicate pieces.


 

#9) Nicole ZuraitisHive Mind (2017). Zuraitis’s career has already touched jazz, pop and classical. Her last beautiful album contains eight intimate original compositions and two covers which span these different music styles.


 

#10) Ilya BesheviNight Forest (2016). The music composed by this Russian artist transports the listener from dramatic soundscapes to calmer and more serene choruses.


 

#11) Faraj SuleimanOnce Upon a City (2017). The music composed by the Palestinian musician explores the relation between the Piano and Eastern music, with touching elements from Western culture including Jazz and Rock.


 

#12) Jacob PavekBloom (2016). This elegant album from the American composer offers a beautiful collection of melancholic themes, all played with grace and finesse.