Best Music Albums of 2017 …so far

Edit: there is an updated chart for the Best Music in 2017. Check it out from the Homepage.

1) John Garcia, The Coyote Who Spoke In Tongues.

Genres: Stoner, Acoustic.

A new studio album by the prolific and legendary voice of stoner metal. This acoustic album cointains some re-arrangements of Kyuss-era songs together with new original material. Garcia is here accompanied by acoustic guitarist Ehren Groban, percussionist Greg Saenz, and bassist Mike Pygmie.

“An emotional acoustic ride through Garcia’s solo work as well as songs by Kyuss in new arrangements like you have never heard before.” (Blabbermouth.com)

Guerino’s previous entry for this album is here.

2) Japandroids, Near to the Wild Heart of Life.

Genres: Indie Rock, Post-punk.

The third studio album by the canadian rockers Japandroids, five years after the widely acclaimed “Celebration Rock”. The band actually consists of Brian King (guitar, vocals) and David Prowse (drums, vocals).

“After nearly a five-year wait, Japandroids could have written a record with more wind beneath its wings, but the pace of Near To The Wild Heart Of Life is consumable enough to warrant repeat listens.” (Consequence of Sound)

Guerino’s previous entry for this album is here.

3) Max Richter, Three Worlds: Music From Woolf Works.

Genre: Neoclassical.

The new album from the best-selling german composer collects some of the best music he wrote for the 2015 critically-acclaimed ballet “Woolf Works”, which was inspired by the life and works of English novelist Virginia Woolf. The first track on the album features spoken words by Virginia Woolf herself, reading the essay “Craftsmanship” from a BBC recording of 1937.

“Max Richter’s score for the narrative dance piece Woolf Works shows how the minimalist composer has become obsessed with storytelling in the later years of his career.” (Pitchfork)

Guerino’s previous entry for this album is here.

4) John Abercrombie Quartet, Up And Coming.

Genre: Modern Jazz.

Guitarist and jazz-rock pioneer John Abercrombie returns with a second album by his quartet featuring Marc Copland on piano, along with longtime rhythm partners Drew Gress and Joey Baron.

“Four years is a long time between releases, but it was worth the wait. Here’s hoping for more from this quartet. And sooner rather than later.” (All About Jazz)

Guerino’s previous entry for this album is here.

5) Bonobo, Migration.

Genres: Electronica, Downbeat, Trip-Hop.

The sixth ablum by musician, DJ and producer Simon Green, aka Bonobo. The album features alsoNick Murphy (Chet Faker), Rhye, Innov Gnawa and Hundred Waters.

“Migration cements his place in the very highest echelons of electronic music and beyond. By turns lush, manic, beautiful, melancholy, joyful, packed with both emotion and technical skill, this is perhaps his most ambitious attempt yet to capture the very textures of human existence in his work.” (Ninjatune)

Guerino’s previous entry for this album is here.

6) Chris Thile & Brad Mehldau, S/T

Genres: Modern Jazz, Progressive Bluegrass.

A curious and innovative album by bluegrass prodigy mandolinist and singer Chris Thile and best-selling jazz pianist Brad Mehldau, longtime admirers of each other’s work. Thile and Mehldau first toured as a duo in 2013; they performed together again in 2015, after which they recorded this studio album. This effort contains a mix of originals and covers from Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Elliott Smith and  late 16th /early 17th century Irish harpist and composer Ruaidri Dáll Ó Catháin. Last year Mehldau released another duo album with american saxophonist Joshua Redman, Nearness.

“Thile and Mehldau deliver a set of deeply engaging, organically realized songs that perfectly balance their respective jazz and bluegrass skills. Given that they seemingly come from polar ends of the musical spectrum, the collaboration may feel like an odd choice at first. However, after hearing this debut, one might be hard-pressed to imagine a more compatible duo to emerge from their generation than these two distinctive mavericks.” (All Music)

7) Dropkick Murphys, 11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory

Genres: Punk Rock, Celtic Rock, Pop Rock.

The ninth studio album by the Boston-based celtic-punk band.

“This album finds the band serving up pint after pint of a familiar brew — the heady blend of fist-pumping anthems, traditional Irish instrumentation, and scrappy, blue-collar grit that’s made them a household name — while using their distilled strengths to break fresh ground.” (Boston Globe)

8) AFI, The Blood Album

Genres: Pop Rock, Alternative

The comeback album by the American rock band is the tenth studio release of their long career.

“Although AFI (The Blood Album) doesn’t reinvent the wheel, it doesn’t need to: The record illustrates that the members of AFI are deeply committed to forward motion, and remain as fired up now as they were 25 years ago.” (A.V. Club)

9) The XX, I See You

Genres: Indie Pop, Electronic

The third studio album by English indie pop band which  debuted at number one on the British albums chart.

“The xx have taken in all the experiences and lessons they have learned since their breakthrough and come up with their most adventurous and quietly uplifting release to date.” (music OHM)

10) You Me At Six, Night People

Genres: Pop Rock, Alternative

The fifth studio album by the English rock band, which sees a departure from the band’s usual style for a much darker and heavier tone.

“Perhaps it isn’t the album we were expecting from the band, but it is the one they wanted (and arguably needed) to make right now. Crammed with skyscraping melodies and moments of spine-tingling poignancy, it stands them in the best possible stead for packing out stadiums and headlining festivals in the near future.” (RockSound)

Advertisements

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s